The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Cautions Against Australian Proposal To Impose Mandatory Bargaining Code on Select U.S. Tech Firms

Washington – Australia’s Parliament is considering legislation to introduce a controversial Code of Conduct that would require certain U.S. internet companies to subsidize local news content producers by imposing obligations such as payment for links to news content.  The Computer & Communications Industry Association has advocated for access to information online for more than two…

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Tech Associations Offer Digital Trade Priorities for Biden-Harris Administration

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association joined 4 other associations in a statement to the incoming Biden Administration on digital trade. This is critical at a time when some longtime trading partners are enacting new barriers to cross-border delivery of digital services and goods. Industry encourages the Biden-Harris Administration to make open, rules-based…

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CCIA Calls For Strong U.S. Response as Result of Section 301 Investigations into Digital Tax

Washington — The U.S. Trade Representative has released its reports in the Section 301 investigations into the digital services taxes (DSTs) of the United Kingdom, Spain, and Austria. USTR concluded that these taxes were discriminatory against U.S. tech firms, and are inconsistent with prevailing principles of international taxation, and burden U.S. commerce. This follows last…

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German Legislature Preempts EU Reforms with National Competition Law Amendments Targeting the Digital Economy

Berlin, GERMANY — Members of the German parliament voted to approve far-reaching regulations for large digital platforms today. Once signed into law, the proposal would make Germany the first jurisdiction in the EU specifically regulating market power in the digital economy. The reform introduces article 19a in the German “Act against Restraints of Competition,” setting…

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