The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

AT&T to Verizon : “We’ll Keep the World Safe for Big Telecom Mergers, You Go Kill That Pesky FCC Open Internet Rule”

Ahh, the co-ordinated effects possible between two giant duopolists. Now that the trial schedule has been set for the new 21st century U.S. v. AT&T antitrust case, AT&T litigators will be vigorously defending in court the iconic behmoth’s right to acquire and thereby eliminate one of its three national mobile telecom competitors, T-Mobile.  If successful, the acquisition…

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ECPA Petition Urges Reform

CCIA has been deeply involved for a long time in efforts to convince Congress to give the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) the attention it deserves. ECPA, written in 1986, dictates under what circumstances the government may demand a person’s information when it is stored online. The law predates much of what we know as…

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CCIA's new Huffington Post column

CCIA President & CEO Ed Black will be blogging regularly on technology policy and telecom policy issues for the Huffington Post. He filed his most recent post on the WTO panel discussion he led last week in Geneva on how we need to enforce existing trade agreements and better protections for Internet freedom into new…

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CCIA’s new Huffington Post column

CCIA President & CEO Ed Black will be blogging regularly on technology policy and telecom policy issues for the Huffington Post. He filed his most recent post on the WTO panel discussion he led last week in Geneva on how we need to enforce existing trade agreements and better protections for Internet freedom into new…

Read more

IRS Tax Prep Not A Budget Solution

CCIA has long opposed efforts in Congress to implement “Return-Free Filing”, a proposal under which the IRS would fill out tax returns and send them to the taxpayer for approval — rather than have taxpayers fill them out themselves.  We object to Return-Free due to factors such as government competition with the private sector, the…

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