The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA's Requested Comments on Europe's IPR Enforcement Directive

Brussels – CCIA stressed the importance of the Internet as a platform for artists and entrepreneurs to create, innovate and reach new markets across the world in its comments on intellectual property enforcement for the European Commission. The Commission requested public consultation on the report on the application of the Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement Directive (IPRED). IPR protection remains…

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House Hearing on Visas For Highly Skilled Workers

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services started accepting visa petitions for FY 2012 for highly skilled workers this month. Last week, the Immigration Policy and Enforcement Subcommittee of the House Judiciary Committee held its hearing, “H-1B Visas: Designing a Program to Meet the Needs of the U.S. Economy and U.S. Workers.” As Chairman Elton Gallegly…

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AT&T Swallows Competition – Haven’t We Seen this Movie Before?

This all seems eerily familiar.  AT&T uses JP Morgan’s money to buy-out up-start competitors.  The firm argues to antitrust authorities that its monopolist tendencies will provide the benefit of expanding connectedness to more Americans.  Thus, the argument went, elimination of competition was really for the public’s benefit. Whether these events recall the creation of the…

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AT&T Swallows Competition – Haven’t We Seen this Movie Before?

This all seems eerily familiar.  AT&T uses JP Morgan’s money to buy-out up-start competitors.  The firm argues to antitrust authorities that its monopolist tendencies will provide the benefit of expanding connectedness to more Americans.  Thus, the argument went, elimination of competition was really for the public’s benefit. Whether these events recall the creation of the…

Read more