The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

EU Postpones Further Net Neutrality Action For Now

European regulators said Thursday the EU, many of whose member states already have rules to prevent network operators from discriminating against other Internet access providers, would not enact additional rules on net neutrality for now. Europe already has more extensive regulation of last mile broadband access than does the United States, and competition among providers…

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Tech Policy Preview for 2011

Senator McConnell announced last Thursday that he’s resolved to stop any and all legislative initiatives supported by the White House and/or the Democratic Majority in the Senate. Current House Minority Leader John Boehner, however, has expressed an interest in working with the President and across the aisle in Congress on the chief priority identified by…

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Broadband Report Shows Digital Divide Remains

The Commerce Department released its broadband report today showing seven times more customers have high speed Internet service, but that gaps in who has access remain. The report is based on census data from 2001 through 2010.FCC Chairman Genachowski has made closing that digital divide a priority in his National Broadband Plan. He said the…

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Net Neutrality In The Wake Of The Election

In the wake of Tuesday’s election results, the demise of net neutrality has been greatly exaggerated. Here are the facts: In May 73 Democrats signed on to a letter outlining their opposition to the FCC imposing net neutrality rules through reclassification. In June 32 Democrats signed a letter in support of reclassification. In late October…

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