The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

Commission Publishes New IPR Strategy

The European Commission released a broad Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) strategy today, which defines outstanding initiatives in the areas of authors’ IPRs, trademarks, designs, and geographical indications. The preliminary Directive covering orphan works was introduced today. Other topics will be introduced in the second half of the year or next year. The Computer & Communications Industry Association…

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Upcoming Event: Media Briefing of Antitrust Experts on AT&T – T-Mobile Takeover

The proposed takeover of T-Mobile USA’s wireless communications business by AT&T raises serious competition policy issues that require careful analysis by the Federal Communications Commission and the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. The proposed transaction would reduce the number of national wireless carriers from four to three, and more importantly, create an…

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Upcoming Event: Media Briefing of Antitrust Experts on AT&T – T-Mobile Takeover

The proposed takeover of T-Mobile USA’s wireless communications business by AT&T raises serious competition policy issues that require careful analysis by the Federal Communications Commission and the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. The proposed transaction would reduce the number of national wireless carriers from four to three, and more importantly, create an…

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Leahy Introduces Online Privacy Legislation

Judiciary Chairman Patrick Leahy has introduced long awaited legislation to update the Electronic Communications Privacy Act that sets the ground rules for law enforcement to gather electronic information on citizens. The existing ECPA law was written before the modern Internet had developed. We now rely more on computing, including cloud computing, and face complex issues…

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Senators Reintroduce COICA Under New Name, Same Controversial Internet Censorship Directives

Today, the blogosphere has lit up with controversy as the Bill Formerly Known As COICA was reintroduced in the Senate, sporting a new coat of paint and a freshly minted backronym: “the PROTECTIP Act.”  TechDirt, Public Knowledge, Prof. Wendy Seltzer, the Technology Liberation Front, CDT, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have all weighed in with a variety of concerns.  CCIA’s statement is here. By…

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