The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Presents Recommendations In Meetings with Incoming Portuguese EU Presidency

Brussels, BELGIUM — The Computer & Communications Industry Association is leading a series of meetings Tuesday with Portuguese politicians and senior officials ahead of Portugal taking over the Presidency of the Council of the EU on 1 January. CCIA is also presenting its recommendations on the range of new EU proposals that will impact Europe’s…

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CCIA Statement On Biden Presidency

Washington — After a contentious election, President-elect Joe Biden will take over as the U.S. responds to the coronavirus and economic fallout.  The Biden-Harris Administration will be confronted with many crucial policy matters, including technology policy. The tech sector has helped keep people connected to school, work and family during the pandemic and the industry…

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CCIA Details Success of U.S. Free Trade Agreements to U.S. International Trade Commission

Washington – The International Trade Commission is currently preparing a report on the economic impact of various U.S. free trade agreements. The Computer & Communications filed comments Friday explaining how free trade agreements have shown steady improvements in provisions to help expand digitally-enabled trade, which is the fastest growing sector in trade in services. Last…

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CCIA Identifies Trade Barriers For Internet and Technology Services to USTR

Washington — U.S. Internet and technology services continue to face rising trade barriers in foreign markets around the world. The Computer & Communications Industry Association detailed examples of these growing digital trade barriers in response to trade officials’ annual request for comments. USTR will issue its National Trade Estimates (NTE) report Spring 2021 that identifies…

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CCIA Offers Comments To Commerce Department On Export Controls

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association submitted comments in response to a Commerce Department inquiry about proposed new export controls on foundational technologies. CCIA expressed its concern that the controls as outlined in the Federal Register notice would limit U.S. exports to global customers, risk technological advancements, and deter global adoption of U.S.…

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