The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Applauds USTR Investigation Into French Digital Tax

Washington — US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer has announced an investigation into France’s proposed digital services tax, which is widely understood as targeting U.S. technology companies for unique taxation. The French measure cleared the lower house of Parliament last week. A vote in the French senate is expected as early as Thursday. The French tax…

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CCIA Industry Welcomes Bipartisan Warning to Lighthizer, Administration on French Digital Services Tax

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association commends Representatives Suzan DelBene and Darin LaHood, co-chairs of the Congressional Digital Trade Caucus, for calling upon the U.S. Administration to take “prompt and targeted action” in response to France’s Digital Services Tax. The letter echoes remarks by U.S. Trade Representative Lighthizer at today’s House Ways &…

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CCIA Warns Section 230 Bill Sets Up Government Censorship Of Online Speech; Less Freedom For Internet Sites To Remove Extremist Content

Washington — Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., has introduced legislation that would give tech companies the option of either applying to the government for a license to remove particular content like hate speech — or take an entirely hands-off approach. The bill to remove Section 230 liability protections without a government license and scrutiny of a…

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Leading European Software Security Firm, Guardtime, Joins CCIA

Brussels, BELGIUM — The Computer & Communications Industry Association welcomes Guardtime, it’s newest member in Europe. Guardtime is a technology company founded in Estonia and headquartered in Switzerland that has developed the KSI Blockchain technology stack. CCIA is an international nonprofit tech trade association that advocates for innovation and competitive conditions for the tech industry.…

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