The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

An Open Letter from Our CEO: Three Strikes; Now What?

Today, CCIA ran an open letter in several Washington, DC publications highlighting yesterday’s ruling by the European Commission, which found Intel guilty of abusing its monopoly position. After years of investigating, the Commission ruled that Intel’s actions significantly harmed competition and innovation, ordered it to cease its abusive practices and issued a $1.45 billion fine.…

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Obama DOJ Withdraws Bush Administration Antitrust Directive

Assistant Attorney General Christine Varney’s announced this morning at the Center for American Progress that the Department of Justice is withdrawing a 2008 Bush administration report that made it more difficult to police anticompetitive behavior. Ed Black, the President & CEO of the Computer & Communications Industry Association spoke on the antitrust panel that followed…

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Upcoming Event: 36th Annual Washington Caucus

Computer and Communications Industry Association 36 Annual Washington Caucus May 6, 2009 NEWSEUM Featuring: Rep. Rick Boucher, Rep. Zoe Lofgren, Rep. Anna Eshoo, Rep. Goodlatte, and more to be announced… Register Online $250 for CCIA members (first ticket) and $200 for each additional ticket $400 for nonmembers (first ticket) and $350 for each additional Space…

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CCIA Releases 110th Congress High Tech Scorecard

Twenty-two senators scored above 80 percent on tech and innovation votes during the second session of the 110th Congress, which ended earlier this year. In the House, 32 members scored in the top tier with a score of over 84 percent. The Computer & Communications Industry Association released its annual High-Tech Scorecard Wednesday in conjunction…

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