The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA's Recommendations to Obama's Transition Team

As President-elect Obama takes his oath of office to defend the Constitution, he will have the opportunity to protect the Constitution’s most important 1st¬†Amendment, which guards free speech, in new and unique ways. Never before has there been a national leader who better understood both the importance of free speech and the power of the…

Read more

Reps. Markey, Boucher Trading Gavels

Rep. Ed Markey, D-Mass., and Rep. Rick Boucher, D-Va., have announced they are switching gavels on the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Rep. Markey will leave as chairman of the Telecommunications and the Internet subcommittee to head the Energy and Environment Subcommittee with its former chair, Boucher, taking over the telecommunications subcommittee. The following statement…

Read more

A Little Knowledge Is A Dangerous Thing

The Computer & Communications Industry Association is issuing the following statement in response to an article in Monday’s paper, ‘Google Wants Its Own Fast Track on the Web,’ which contained several mistakes. The following statement can be attributed to Ed Black, President & CEO of CCIA: “We are disappointed that the WSJ continues to misunderstand…

Read more

Intel Attack On EC Ahead of Findings

The Computer & Communications Industry Association is offering the following statement in response to new details released by the Financial Times and other news outlets on the latest details of the European Commission’s Intel antitrust investigation. It can be attributed to CCIA President & CEO Ed Black: “We are disappointed that Intel has apparently chosen…

Read more

CCIA Op Ed On IP/Trade Published Today

By Ed Black Special to the Mercury News Posted: 12/08/2008 05:39:33 PM PST As the Obama administration seeks to boost the innovation economy and repair strained relations around the world, it needs to change our current 20th century foreign policy when it comes to intellectual property. For decades, the U.S. government has aggressively pursued ever-increasing…

Read more