The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Supports Efforts to Address Censorship Practices, Digital Trade Barriers in China Legislation

Washington, DC — The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) supports efforts by Senator Wyden and others to include language in the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act to address foreign censorship practices and strengthen the ability of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative to combat digital trade barriers. Foreign censorship practices by authoritarian regimes,…

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CCIA Offers Written Statement To Subcommittee Ahead Of SHOP SAFE Hearing Thursday

Washington — The House Judiciary IP Subcommittee holds a hearing this afternoon on H.R. 3429 (the Stopping Harmful Offers on Platforms by Screening Against Fakes in E-Commerce Act, or SHOP SAFE Act), which would establish prescriptive requirements aimed at reducing the sale of counterfeit and unsafe products online. This legislation proposes ambiguous and onerous provisions…

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Industry Groups Release Statement on the EU Digital Services Act Ahead of Council Meeting

Brussels, BELGIUM — Ahead of a EU ministers’ meeting today the Computer & Communications Industry Association joined Allied for Startups and other industry groups in a joint statement on the proposed EU Digital Services Act. The following can be attributed to CCIA Europe Senior Public Policy Manager Alex Maglione: “We commend the Member States’ high…

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CCIA Affirms Support For New EU Disinformation Guidelines

Brussels, BELGIUM — The European Commission today published its new Guidance to strengthen the EU Code of Practice on Disinformation. The European Commission will now work with the involved companies to improve several aspects of the Code based on clear commitments and subject to an oversight mechanism in order to fight the spread of disinformation.…

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CCIA Joins Industry Statement on the Need for Regulatory Dialogue in the Proposed Digital Markets Act

Brussels, BELGIUM – The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) has joined other industry associations in a joint statement on the Digital Markets Act ahead of the EU ministers’ meeting on May 27-28. The statement urges ministers to strengthen and foster a true “regulatory dialogue”. This envisioned participatory approach to intervention should replace suspicion and…

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