The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Opposes Federal Technology Mandates

Washington, DC – The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) today announced its opposition to legislation proposed yesterday by Senator Fritz Hollings (D-South Carolina). The Consumer Broadband and Digital Television Promotion Act (CBDTPA) of 2002, will force poorly designed and unworkable standards upon industry resulting in a freeze in innovation, a decrease in consumer choice…

Read more

Microsoft/DoJ offer little in Revised Settlement

Washington, DC – Microsoft and the Department of Justice late last night proposed a new settlement in the historic antitrust proceedings against the PC operating-system monopoly. The proposal’s backers say the new language makes only “clarifying modifications” to the original. Computer & Communications Industry Association President and CEO Ed Black responded with the following comments:…

Read more

CCIA Seeks to Intervene in Microsoft Settlement Hearing

Justice Department, Microsoft want rubber stamp, not public participation Washington, DC – The court overseeing the proposed Microsoft antitrust settlement must hear directly from outside parties before it approves the deal, the Computer & Communications Industry Association said in a filing to Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly today. “More than 15,000 people told the Justice Department they…

Read more

CCIA Opposes Speech Restrictions on the Internet

Washington, DC – A proposed addition to an international computer crime treaty endangers free speech and could impose broad liability on Internet service providers and websites if ratified, the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) said today. CCIA President Ed Black joined a broad coalition of, businesses, industry associations, and civil liberties groups in sending…

Read more