The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

EU and US Policy and Tech Leaders Discuss Tech Policy At CCIA’s Transatlantic Event

Washington — Senior U.S. government and EU officials and tech representatives discussed digital policy issues requiring cooperation like cybersecurity and online censorship at CCIA’s “Transatlantic Digital Economy 2019” event Thursday afternoon. Robert Strayer, Ambassador & Deputy Assistant Secretary for Cyber and International Communications and Information Policy for the U.S. Department of State and Roberto Viola,…

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FTC Wins Legal Case Against Qualcomm; CCIA Brief Supported FTC

Washington — The FTC has won its legal case against Qualcomm. The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California found that Qualcomm’s licensing approach was anticompetitive.  Judge Koh’s order requires Qualcomm to license standard essential patents to other competitors, bars them from threatening to cut off chip supply, and bars them from requiring…

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CCIA Asks USTR To Delay Additional China Tariffs

Washington — Following the President’s direction over the weekend, the U.S. Trade Representative announced in today’s Federal Register that it will increase the tariffs from 10 percent to 25 percent on $200 billion in Chinese goods as of Friday due to reported Chinese backtracking on commitments. The Computer & Communications Industry Association has criticized China’s…

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CCIA expresses serious concerns with Russia law to control Internet

Washington — The Russian government has enacted legislation that will extend Russia’s authoritarian control of the Internet by taking steps to create a local Internet infrastructure, shutting out citizens from the rest of the online world.  CCIA has previously raised concerns regarding the steady rise in action by the Russia government to limit Internet freedom…

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