The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA CONDEMNS POSTAL SERVICE ENTRY INTO COMMERCIAL E-COMMERCE FINANCIAL SERVICES

Cites Government Competition with Private Sector; Threat To Consumer Privacy Washington, DC- The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) assailed the announcement by the United States Postal Service (USPS) of its further expansion into competition with private, commercial business. Earlier today, the USPS announced that it was forming a strategic alliance with CheckFree to offer…

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GOVERNMENT BREAKS ITS OWN NON-COMPETITION LAW

CCIA ASKS THE ADVISORY COMMISSION ON ELECTRONIC COMMERCE TO INVESTIGATE GOVERNMENT VS PRIVATE COMPETITION   Washington, DC- The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) sent a letter to the Chairman, Jim Gilmore III, of the Advisory Commission on Electronic Commerce asking that body address the issue of government agencies launching consumer electronic services that are in…

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CCIA ENDORSES HITECH ACT OF 2000

Proposed legislation will help tech industry shortage and educate/train Americans for future Washington, DC- The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) has sent a letter to Congressman David Dreier (R-CA) and Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) in support of the Helping to Improve Technology Education and Achievement (HITECH) Act of 2000. CCIA believes it is balanced…

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CCIA ADVOCATES MICROSOFT REMEDIES

Washington, DC- The Computer & Communications Industry Association is still calling for a physical breakup of Microsoft in order to restore compeitiotn and freeing the source code could do it. Today, Microsoft made the final arguments to the government before determining whether or not the software giant broke antitrust laws. The judge has offered no…

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CCIA FILES AMICUS BRIEF AGAINST MICROSOFT

Washington, DC- Today the Computer & Communications Association (CCIA) filed an amicus brief against Microsoft at the United States District Court. CCIA filed the briefing on behalf of their memberships’ vital interest in the future structure of the computer software industry and its dependency on whether or not they can thrive in a fair, innovative…

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