The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

Computer & Communications Industry Association names Mary Hewitt as Director of Communications

Washington, D.C. August 11, 1999 – The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) announced the appointment of Mary E. Hewitt as Director of Communications. With more than a decade of experience and expertise in public affairs and policy, she joins the Association at a critical juncture. “With Washington getting more and more involved in the high-tech…

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Computer & Communications Industry Association names Mary Hewitt as Director of Communications

Washington, D.C. August 11, 1999 – The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) announced the appointment of Mary E. Hewitt as Director of Communications. With more than a decade of experience and expertise in public affairs and policy, she joins the Association at a critical juncture. “With Washington getting more and more involved in the high-tech…

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CCIA LAUDS PRESIDENT’S DECISION TO OVERHAUL COMPUTER EXPORT CONTROLS

Washington, D.C.,  July 1, 1999 – Reacting to President Clinton’s decision to revise export controls on computers and semiconductors, the Computer & Communications Industry Association offered praise for the White House decision. This morning President Clinton issued a statement announcing that the Administration had decided to raise existing export control levels on sales of computers…

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CCIA Praises Congress, White House on Y2K Agreement

Washington, D.C., June 29, 1999 – In the wake of their coming to terms on Year 2000 liability legislation, the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) today praised both House, Senate, and White House negotiators for their hard work and for their forbearance in producing legislation that will prevent a outbreak of Y2K-related litigation early…

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CCIA: Is Microsoft's New Defense Defensible?

New Study Reveals Microsoft Monopoly Not Threatened By AOL/Netscape Deal Washington, DC, June 17, 1999 – The Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA) today released a study that discredits the foundation of Microsoft’s defense strategy in its antitrust trial.  The study, Is Microsoft’s New Defense Defensible? concludes that the merger of America Online and Netscape has no impact…

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CCIA: Is Microsoft’s New Defense Defensible?

New Study Reveals Microsoft Monopoly Not Threatened By AOL/Netscape Deal Washington, DC, June 17, 1999 – The Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA) today released a study that discredits the foundation of Microsoft’s defense strategy in its antitrust trial.  The study, Is Microsoft’s New Defense Defensible? concludes that the merger of America Online and Netscape has no impact…

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