The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA: Is Microsoft’s New Defense Defensible?

New Study Reveals Microsoft Monopoly Not Threatened By AOL/Netscape Deal Washington, DC, June 17, 1999 – The Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA) today released a study that discredits the foundation of Microsoft’s defense strategy in its antitrust trial.  The study, Is Microsoft’s New Defense Defensible? concludes that the merger of America Online and Netscape has no impact…

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CCIA’S Black Supports Bliley Bill on Databases; Cautions Against Legislation That Would Harm the Internet

Washington, D.C., June 15, 1999 – Today before the House Telecommunications Subcommittee, CCIA President Ed Black expressed his support for H.R. 1858, the Consumer and Investor Access to Information Act of 1999.  He also expressed very strong reservations regarding other legislative proposals that would confer market dominance of one database creator over another. In his statement,…

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CCIA President Tells Congress More Encryption Export Reforms Are Needed to Protect National Security, U.S. Competitiveness

Washington, DC, May 19, 1999 – Calling on Congress to relax encryption export controls, Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA) President Edward J. Black testified before a congressional panel yesterday afternoon that overly restrictive export controls on encryption products threaten national security interests and competitively disadvantage many strategically important companies within his industry. Encryption is the primary means…

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CCIA Lambastes Chamber, Commends Robb for Y2K Leadership

Washington, DC, May 17, 1999 – Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA) President Edward J. Black today lambasted the U.S. Chamber of Commerce for accusing U.S. Senator Chuck Robb, D-VA, of being “missing in action” on crucial Year 2000 (Y2K) legislation.  Nothing could be further from the truth, Black said, noting that Robb has consistently fought…

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CCIA to Hold 1999 Annual Washington Caucus

Washington, DC, May 12, 1999 – The Computer and Communications Industry Association (CCIA) announced today that it will hold its 26th Annual Washington Caucus at The St. Regis hotel in Washington, D.C., from May 23 through May 25.  The Caucus features key government figures, who will discuss, among other policy topics, critical technology and telecommunications industry…

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CEU Action Risks Crippling ISPs, Black Says

Washington, D.C., May 11, 1999 –  Citing the devastating consequences of assigning content responsibility to Internet Service Providers (ISPs), the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) is calling upon the Clinton Administration to urge European Union (EU) countries to reject legislation that would hold providers liable for transmissions of illegal Web site content. CCIA President Ed…

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