The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA ADVOCATES MICROSOFT REMEDIES

Washington, DC- The Computer & Communications Industry Association is still calling for a physical breakup of Microsoft in order to restore compeitiotn and freeing the source code could do it. Today, Microsoft made the final arguments to the government before determining whether or not the software giant broke antitrust laws. The judge has offered no…

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CCIA FILES AMICUS BRIEF AGAINST MICROSOFT

Washington, DC- Today the Computer & Communications Association (CCIA) filed an amicus brief against Microsoft at the United States District Court. CCIA filed the briefing on behalf of their memberships’ vital interest in the future structure of the computer software industry and its dependency on whether or not they can thrive in a fair, innovative…

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CCIA APPLAUDS RELAXATION OF COMPUTER EXPORT CONTROLS

Washington, DC- The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) praised the Clinton Administration for today’s announcement that it would relax controls on the export of high performance computers. “We have urged the Administration to take this step and are encouraged by their efforts to keep pace with advances and innovations in the computer industry,” stated…

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Ultra Wideband Technology Moving Forward, Says CCIA President Ed Black

Washington, DC- Commenting on the report just released by the National Telecommunication and Information Administration (NTIA) on ultra-wideband (UWB) technology, Ed Black, President and CEO of CCIA, the Computer & Communications Industry Association expressed pleasure that the report recognized UWB technology as one of the most promising technologies of our time. “We are pleased that…

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CCIA PRAISES NEW ENCRYPTION EXPORT REGULATIONS

Washington, DC- The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) has long supported the elimination of ineffective and counterproductive encryption export controls and applauds the Clinton Administration for fulfilling the promise of unburdening our industry from these unwise and unnecessary restrictions. In response to yesterday’s release of interim final regulations by the Commerce Department’s Bureau of…

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