The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

European Finance Ministers Should Focus on Global Tax Reform, Not Unilateral Actions

Brussels, BELGIUM — European Finance Ministers are meeting in Brussels tomorrow, Tuesday, for the Economic and Financial Affairs Council (ECOFIN) meeting where they will consider the EU Digital Services Tax (DST) proposal.  The DST would levy a 3% tax on certain so-called digital companies’ turnover.  It would apply from January 2022. G20 leaders this weekend…

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G-20 Summit Offers Opportunities To De-Escalate Tensions

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association calls on U.S. officials to use the upcoming Group of 20 Summit to improve relations and reduce tensions with trade partners. Leaders of the world’s biggest economies will be meeting Friday and Saturday in Argentina to discuss a range of economic issues. Officials should take heed of…

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EU Member States Reach Political Agreement on the ‘Platform-to-Business’ Regulation

Brussels, BELGIUM —  Today EU Member States reached a political agreement on the Council’s position on the ‘platform-to-business’ (P2B) Regulation. The adoption of the so-called ‘general approach’ is the first key step towards the final negotiation and adoption of the Regulation by Council and the European Parliament. The European Parliament has yet to adopt its…

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CCIA Recommendations on Negotiating Priorities for U.S-Japan Trade

Washington — As the U.S. considers its negotiating objectives for a potential U.S.-Japan free trade agreement, the Computer & Communications Industry Association filed comments today with USTR outlining digital trade priorities. The comments discuss the needs for an intellectual property chapter that ensures protections for online intermediaries and includes limitations and exceptions necessary for the…

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