The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Opposes U.K. Digital Services Tax

Washington —  The UK’s Digital Services Tax came into effect today. This follows the UK’s March 11 release of its 2020 Budget which announced that the UK will move forward with legislation to introduce a digital services tax of 2 percent. First payments under this new tax will be due in 2021.  The Computer &…

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USTR Releases Annual Report Identifying Digital Trade Barriers

Washington — The U.S. Trade Representative has issued its annual National Trade Estimates (NTE) report that noted the expanded use of digital trade barriers by trading partners. For the 2020 Report, USTR reiterated concerns with the rise in digital services taxes, restrictions on cross-border data flows and data localization requirements, Internet censorship, and online content-based…

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CCIA Offers OMB Draft Comments On Artificial Intelligence

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association filed comments on Artificial Intelligence today in response to a request from the Office of Management and Budget. CCIA said the principles that OMB has proposed in the Guidance for Regulation of Artificial Intelligence Applications provide a strong foundation for federal agencies to craft regulations while maintaining…

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CCIA To Testify At Senate Hearing Tuesday On Copyright Enforcement In Other Countries

Washington — The Senate Judiciary Intellectual Property Subcommittee will hear from witnesses Tuesday about how other countries handle online copyright infringement and liability for what users post online. Europe has enacted copyright regulations recently that are out of sync with balanced copyright measures followed by the U.S. like the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, and the…

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