The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

Victoria de Posson joins CCIA In Brussels

Brussels, BELGIUM — Victoria de Posson has joined the Computer & Communications Industry Association’s Brussels team and will advocate on tech policy issues including Artificial Intelligence, copyright, and digital services. Victoria comes to CCIA from FTI Consulting, where she has advised Fortune 500 companies on public policy strategy. Previously she worked for Samsung Electronics, Burson…

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G7 Leaders Commit to Global Tax Reform, Presidents Trump and Macron Discuss French Digital Tax

Washington — At the conclusion of the G7 Leaders Summit taking place over this weekend in Biarritz, France, the G7 leaders committed to reaching an agreement in 2020 to “modernize international taxation within the framework of the OECD.”  President Macron also indicated France and the US were close to a “compromise” regarding the French digital…

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‘Off-Facebook Activity’ Feature Offers Consumers New Transparency and Control

Washington — Today Facebook announced the release of its long-anticipated ‘Clear History’ tool named “off-Facebook Activity”. This feature allows users to access browsing data recorded by third-party websites and applications for advertising purposes and to disassociate that information from their Facebook accounts.  The Computer & Communications Industry Association has long supported industry efforts to empower…

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CCIA Applauds Business Roundtable Letter Redefining Corporate Responsibility

Washington — The Business Roundtable has announced its commitment via a letter signed by 181 corporate CEOs to operate their business to benefit all stakeholders including not just shareholders, but customers, employees, suppliers and communities. The Computer & Communications Industry Association applauds the Business Roundtable for encouraging corporations to re-articulate their purpose. As an international…

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CCIA Files Comments To Justice Department On Music Consent Decrees

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association told the Department of Justice the governing system that the music marketplace relies on to obtain public performance rights is still needed. CCIA’s comments also asked the DOJ to reaffirm that licensing strategies designed to discriminate against new technologies are prohibited by two long-standing antitrust consent decrees…

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