The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Asks USTR To Delay Additional China Tariffs

Washington — Following the President’s direction over the weekend, the U.S. Trade Representative announced in today’s Federal Register that it will increase the tariffs from 10 percent to 25 percent on $200 billion in Chinese goods as of Friday due to reported Chinese backtracking on commitments. The Computer & Communications Industry Association has criticized China’s…

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CCIA expresses serious concerns with Russia law to control Internet

Washington — The Russian government has enacted legislation that will extend Russia’s authoritarian control of the Internet by taking steps to create a local Internet infrastructure, shutting out citizens from the rest of the online world.  CCIA has previously raised concerns regarding the steady rise in action by the Russia government to limit Internet freedom…

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CCIA Supports Bipartisan Effort to Analyze Economic Impact of Broadband

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association supports efforts in the House and Senate to encourage broadband deployment and measure its economic impact.  Today, Senator Amy Klobuchar, along with Senators Capito, Sullivan, Boozman, King, and Cortez Masto, reintroduced the “Measuring the Economic Impact of Broadband Act.” The bill would require the Commerce Department to…

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CCIA, Business Associations Send Letter to Congressional Leaders on Support for USMCA

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association joined a dozen associations in a letter to House and Senate leaders explaining their support for the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement and asking them to approve the deal. The ITC released a report earlier this month on the projected economic impact of the new USMCA trade agreement, identifying…

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CCIA Asks PTO To Preserve Ability To Challenge Weak, Overly Broad Patents

Washington — The Computer & Communications Industry Association has sent a letter to Patent and Trademark Office Director Iancu asking him not to implement new rules that would prevent challenges to weak or overly broad patents. Senators Coons and Tillis sent a letter to PTO Director Iancu expressing concern over so-called “serial” IPR petitions.  The…

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