The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

European Parliament Committee Adopts Position on Regulating Terrorist Content Online

Brussels, BELGIUM — The European Parliament’s Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs Committee (LIBE) adopted its opinion on the draft Regulation on preventing the dissemination of terrorist content online. The text will form the basis of the European Parliament’s position in the final trilogue negotiations with the European Commission and the European Council. The draft…

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CCIA Welcomes Congressional Calls to Treat Digital Services Tax Proposals As Trade Barriers

Washington — Today, Republicans of the House Ways & Means Committee sent a letter to the White House expressing serious concerns regarding France’s and other EU countries’ proposals for a digital services tax. The letter encourages the Administration to “use all appropriate tools to address this issue” and treat the proposed tax as a barrier…

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USTR Highlights Digital Trade Barriers Including Digital Taxes and Data Localization

Washington — The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative released its annual report Friday documenting prominent trade barriers around the world. USTR identifies a number of key barriers for Internet firms exporting services around the world that the Computer & Communications Industry Association highlighted in its own comments submitted last fall. These include a rise…

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CCIA Expresses Concerns About India’s Proposed E-Commerce Framework

Washington — India’s Department for Promotion of Industry and Internal Trade solicited input on  its draft national E-Commerce Framework. In comments ahead of the Friday deadline, the Computer & Communications Industry Association noted India’s ambitious goals to further develop a vibrant, competitive digital economy, but expressed concern that the draft policy proposes a number of…

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