The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Supports International Communications Privacy Act

Washington — Shortly after the introduction of the ECPA Modernization Act in the Senate, Senators Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Chris Coons, D-Del., introduced the International Communications Privacy Act. ICPA would include similar warrant protections for electronic communications and help develop solutions for law enforcement access to communications that do not pertain to U.S. persons or…

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CCIA Applauds Senate For Introducing Updated Privacy Standards For Electronic Communications and Geolocation Information

Washington — Senators Lee and Leahy have introduced legislation that would offer email and geolocation information comprehensive privacy protections consistent with users’ present-day expectations. The Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) was originally written in 1986 before most individuals’ communications were stored online. The ECPA Modernization Act of 2017 introduced Thursday would update ECPA to clearly…

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CCIA Warns Against State Department’s Reported Plans to Shut Down Cyber Office Amid Growing Hacking Threats

Washington — Secretary of State Rex Tillerson announced plans to shut down the State Department’s cyber office, which coordinates with other countries on issues ranging from international hacking to cybersecurity. The Office of the Coordinator for Cyber Issues will be folded into Department’s economic bureau and its head will no longer report to the Secretary…

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