The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

CCIA Highlights To Trump Administration Trade Barriers In China’s Cybersecurity Law

Washington — As the Administration considers how to handle China’s pending new cybersecurity law, the Computer & Communications Industry Association sent a letter to Gary Cohn, the Director of President Trump’s National Economic Council. The letter explains how China’s recently implemented Cybersecurity Law would regulate the use of technology in ways that would be a…

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Bruce Aitken To Serve As Chairman of the Board for CCIA

Washington — Bruce Aitken has been named Chairman of the Board for the Computer & Communications Industry Association at its May board meeting. Aitken takes over for outgoing chairman Ed Peters of OpenConnect. Aitken, a partner at AitkenBerlin, has a distinguished career in international trade, homeland security and film production. He was appointed by both…

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CCIA, Over 60 Organisations To EU Lawmakers: Put The Copyright Reform Back On The Right Track

Brussels, BELGIUM — Today, CCIA and over 60 civil society organisations and trade associations representing Internet users, online services, startups, publishers and research and educational institutions from all over the European Union urge European lawmakers to put the reform on copyright in the Digital Single Market back on the right track. In an open-letter, the…

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CCIA, Tech Industry Coalition Recommend Electronic Surveillance Reform

Washington – Leading technology companies and associations sent a joint letter to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Goodlatte today supporting surveillance reform. The Computer & Communications Industry Association strongly recommends modifying the surveillance powers authorized by Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act so as to improve privacy protections and increase transparency. Specifically, the letter recommends…

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