The administration has characterized the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement as “an ambitious, next-generation, Asia-Pacific trade agreement.” It is being negotiated with Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru Singapore and Vietnam — with Canada and Mexico as set to join.

CCIA’s View:

CCIA supports the speedy completion of a high-quality “21st century” Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. A 21st-century agreement will contain provisions that permit the smooth functioning of the industry of the 21st century — the Internet. The Internet is visibly revolutionizing the way businesses — including small and medium enterprises — function. Without a smoothly functioning Internet, the negotiated provisions of TPP will not yield the desired gains for TPP citizens.

First, TPP must include balanced intellectual property rules. An intellectual property regime can allow technological progress only if it appropriately balances the competing interests between encouraging investment and enabling information access. Because the international trade regime has generally lacked flexible IP provisionis to promote innovation, it is necessary to modernize the IP provisions of the aging trade framework to be consistent with Internet and high-technology innovation.

Second, TPP should promote the free flow of information online, recognizing that blocking bits at the border is as much as affront to international free trade as blocking physical goods. The ability of U.S. businesses to operate effectively on a global scale depends fundamentally on open information flows. When foreign governments block online information, when businesses are impeded for using the Internet to reach international markets, when secure corporate communications are not assured, the collateral damage is done to U.S. exports and U.S. jobs.

Most Recent Statements&Findings:

House, Senate Hold Simultaneous Broadband, Spectrum Hearings

Washington – Both sides of Capitol Hill, the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee and House Energy & Commerce Subcommittee on Communications and Technology held simultaneous hearings Wednesday, often hitting the same notes, as they addressed the central questions of broadband deployment and spectrum allocation.  The Senate hearing focused on barriers to the deployment of…

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CCIA Sends Letter To President Obama Warning Of Dangers Of Encryption Backdoors

Washington — In a letter to President Obama, the Computer & Communications Industry Association said so-called encryption backdoors would create security risks, economic problems for tech sector, and privacy concerns for citizens and international allies. The letter was sent as both the Administration and Congress consider policy proposals to address the growing availability of strong…

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European Commission Issues Platform Questions As Part Of DSM Strategy

Brussels, BELGIUM — The European Commission has begun its public inquiry into online platforms, releasing its consultation today as part of developing its Digital Single Market strategy. The questions cover four main categories: the business practices of online platforms and consumer fairness intermediary liability of online companies data and cloud in digital ecosystems the collaborative…

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