CCIA Appreciates NAS Copyright Study

The National Academy of Sciences has released advanced copies of its long awaited study, “Copyright in the Digital Era: Building Evidence for Policy.” The study provides a roadmap of how copyright laws have changed as distribution of content moves online. The multi-year study began well before policy missteps like SOPA that would have given the entertainment…

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Government Support for Fighting Patent Trolls Grows

Lawmakers have been speaking out about the patent troll epidemic in recent weeks and now it looks like they’re ready to do something about it. Yesterday Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY) announced that he is introducing a bill to expand the covered business methods program established by the 2011 America Invents Act, so that broad, abstract patents can…

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Online Privacy, Security Action This Week

For those who don’t keep as close an eye on privacy, the past week has seen a flurry of activity on a number of privacy related fronts from the US Congress. Topics have included cybersecurity, government surveillance, and the Do Not Track process. Most of these conversation are obviously still ongoing, but a summary after…

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Panelists Discuss Future Internet Governance At World Press Freedom Day Event

Washington- Academics, companies and a State Department official outlined the challenges ahead for Internet governance and Internet freedom at a National Press Club event marking World Press Freedom Day Wednesday. Christopher Painter, the coordinator for cyber issues at the State Department, said the WCIT meeting in Dubai was a wake up call that the multistakeholder…

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The Underestimated Challenge for E-Commerce in Europe: Non-Notification of National Laws

As CCIA has repeatedly reported, Germany was the first country in the European Union to have passed a law, called the Leistungsschutzrecht, that extends copyright protection to text excerpts, like snippets, generated by search engines and online aggregators. Even though the legislature has in the end somehow tried to minimize the impact on online businesses, by…

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US District Court Resolves Viacom v. Youtube Case, Reaffirming DMCA

A trial court resolved outstanding issues in the long-running Viacom v. YouTube copyright case today, exonerating the online video service and dismissing the complaint.  The plaintiffs wanted YouTube penalized for infringement on its platform committed by users, notwithstanding that YouTube had removed content upon complaint — on one occasion, even taking down 100,000 videos overnight. After an appellate decision…

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