Internet Freedom Begins at Home

In the wake of the government ordered shutdown of Internet access in Egypt recently, Washington policymakers are debating various scenarios involving “regulation of the Internet.” The consensus seems to be that government should not be able to act as a gatekeeper or shut off Internet access. In the U.S., dominant private companies also have the ability and…

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International Conference in The Hague: Towards Flexible Copyright?

On February 10, the Dutch Ministry of Security and Justice organized an international conference on copyright in The Hague. The conference provided Dutch decision makers with a good opportunity to share their views of future copyright policy with fellow EU Member States, academics, representatives of the entertainment and Internet industries, and other stakeholders. It was…

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CCIA Welcomes Lungren-Lofgren Resolution Against Internet Tax Collection

The Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) applauds Rep. Dan Lungren (R-CA) and lead Democratic co-sponsor Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) for introducing the “Supporting the Preservation of Internet Entrepreneurs and Small Businesses” resolution (H.Res. 95), a bipartisan resolution opposing any Congressional legislation granting state governments authority to impose new burdensome or unfair tax collecting requirements on small…

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Expansion of CALEA Concerns CCIA

The Computer & Communications Industry Association is sending to all Members of Congress a joint letter expressing concern about the impact of renewed efforts to expand the government’s power to wiretap and electronically spy on citizens. The open letter to members of Congress and the Administration is jointly signed by the American Library Association, the…

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Lightsquared Announcement Disappoints CCIA, Wireless Users

The FCC has revoked Lightsquared’s waiver to operate its nationwide, satellite-based broadband network. The move comes after those trying to block the system lobbied against it claiming it would interfere with GPS traffic. CCIA and others hoping for more available spectrum and more wireless broadband competition are disappointed with this setback. Federal regulatory bureaucracy and…

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On Shakespeare and Domain Name Blocking

Today’s New York Times features a peculiar editorial titled ‘Would the Bard Have Survived the Web?’, by Authors Guild representatives Scott Turow, Paul Aiken, and James Shapiro in advance of tomorrow’s Senate Judiciary hearing on targeting websites engaged in IP infringement. The column proposes the counterfactual notion that Shakespeare could not have survived in the age of…

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